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Daily Update
SNAP food stamps sign
U.S. Department of Agriculture
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Flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0
New Mexico will pay the federal government more than $19 million to settle a claim by the Department of Agriculture that the state mishandled the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and overpaid some needy families in 2014 and 2016, a newspaper reported Tuesday.
Roe v. Wade
abortion protest
Liberation News via Facebook
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Clinics here are already stretched, especially since Texas banned abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy last year, but with several neighboring states now set to all but completely ban the procedure, more people are likely to travel to New Mexico for abortion care.
Local News
  • Heinrich and McDonough in Albuquerque
    Courtesy of the office of Martin Heinrich
    Across New Mexico, healthcare providers and advocates for veterans' care welcomed Monday's news that proposals to close four rural Veterans' Affairs clinics and relocate key mental healthcare would not move forward.
  • sexual violence awareness
    Alyssa M. Akers
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    U.S. Air Force
    The reversal of Roe v. Wade has already triggered abortion bans throughout the country, including some states not recognizing exceptions for rape or incest. KUNM spoke with Alexandria Taylor, Deputy Secretary at the New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs about how the reversal will impact the increasing prevalence of sexual violence.
  • Roe_6-scaled.jpeg
    Shelby Wyatt
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    via Source NM
    Source NM's Shaun Griswold discusses what comes after the disappointment and demonstrations by people who support the right to an abortion.
  • 45440035824_745a51f644_o.jpg
    Bureau of Land Management Idaho
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    During a historically devastating fire season, President Joe Biden announced Tuesday that wildland firefighters will receive a temporary pay raise and benefits like mental health services will be more readily available. Firefighters think the hike is promising, though it may not be enough to retain future firefighters in the southwest.
Mountain West News Bureau